Tailgate latch, un-busted

When we bought the truck, we could only open the tailgate by shoving both hands into the tailgate housing and spending three minutes carefully tweaking the control wires, then attempting to catch the free-falling tailgate with something other than your face. This process worked about 60% of the time. The mechanic quoted me $80 for the new latch plus labor, and I *think* I suppressed my giant eye-roll until I was back in the car.

Here’s the $17 replacement part and the helpful installation video that I followed. Seriously, it took longer to round up the tools than to install the new latch. The most exciting part is prying off the spring clip that holds the lock tumbler in place. Fliiiiing! Be prepared. 

Old latch on the left, replacement on the right

The interior latches on the sides of the tailgate also needed a squirt of lubricant before closing up the housing. One more small repair to check off the list.

Window latch replacement

What is that flappity-flappity-flappity noise coming from the driver side tilt window? Didn’t I just latch it down? On closer inspection,  I found that the black plastic pivot inside the latch was cracked, keeping the window from locking down properly.

Busted pivot piece, held together by dirt and cobwebs

Apparently these pivots are notoriously flimsy, and the window flapping issue is a common complaint on Toyota trucks. Fortunately,  this dude has started manufacturing a solid aluminum replacement pivot. After watching his installation video, we popped the new pivots in on both side windows, and now they both work perfectly. 

Old and busted plastic pieces, and the new aluminum replacement pivot

Shiny new pivot, fewer cobwebs

Rocinante 2.0

We bought Rocinante 2.0 from a young construction guy, who had obviously loved the truck and made several modifications to suit his needs. I have some different plans, starting with a bit of a cleanout.

Rocinante 2.0, upgraded from the Tacoma

First, the two layers of DIY tinting. The film makes the most horrid noise as you rip it off, but it’s no longer noon outside the windshield and midnight in the rear view.

Peeling off the tinting, bit by bit

Mystery wires A – H, gone. I don’t know what these were originally intended to do, but they’re not doing it anymore.  After the nippers and a little excavation via the floorboard trim, we are now random wire-and-cable free.

    

The rear seat was only nominally bolted down, so I went ahead and pulled it out. I have some ideas about building an organizer for water storage, cooler, etc into the back, now that I’ve scored a truck with clamshell doors. No more wrestling the cooler out of the teensy backset of the Tacoma!

So much organization potential